Vancouver, British Columbia

John & Wendy Morton

John & Wendy Morton

We’re passionate about birds and nature. That’s why we opened a Wild Birds Unlimited Nature Shop in our community.

Vancouver, British Columbia

1302 West Broadway,
(at Birch) FREE PARKING IN REAR
Vancouver, BC V6H 1H2

Phone: (604) 736-2676
Fax: (604) 736-5419
Email: Send Message

Store Hours:
Mon - Fri: 9:30 am - 6:00 pm
Sat: 9:30 am - 5:30 pm
Sun: 12:00 pm - 5:00 pm

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We can show you how to turn your yard into a birdfeeding habitat that brings song, color and life to your home.

Welcome to Wild Birds Unlimited in Vancouver!

 

Cashing in on Caching

 Black-capped Chickadee

Right now chickadees, nuthatches, and jays are hiding food to retrieve and eat at a later time. This behavior is called “caching.” Caching helps birds survive during bad weather and when food sources are low. These birds can store hundreds of seeds a day. Each seed is placed in a different location and they generally remember where each one is, even a month later. By providing an easily accessible food source, you can help your birds with their caching needs.

Chickadees prefer to cache black oil sunflower seeds; often eating a small portion before hiding it in and under bark, dead leaves, knotholes, clusters of pine needles, gutters, shingles and in the ground. Chickadees cache more in the middle of the day when visiting feeders.

Red-breasted Nuthatch

Nuthatches prefer heavier sunflower seeds over the lighter ones. Be sure to have some sunflower chips in your blend, too, as they like these 25% more than one in the shell. They cache more in the morning and prefer to hide foods on deeply furrowed tree trunks and the underside of branches. Nuthatches are also known to hide seeds under a shingle or behind wooden siding.

Steller's Jay

Jays love to cache peanuts, sunflower seeds and acorns. They are especially fond of peanuts in the shell. They bury them in the ground and are known to cache about 100 in a day; emptying a feeder in no time. Watch for them make repeated trips to your feeders (or an oak tree) and fly off. They can travel up to two miles to bury their nutritious treasure.

 

Our Customer Appreciation Day was a great success!

Over $600 in donations for O.W.L were received!

Winners of the in store draws have been notified.

 

Jim Slater took these shots of Tyra the Merlin falcon and Jessie the Barred Owl

Karen and Jessie

Karen with Jessie the Barred Owl

Tyra the Merlin

Tyra the Merlin

 

Eagle Optics Rangers on SALE!

Eagle Ranger

Support your local bird lovers. 

We will beat any advertised Canadian price on binoculars and scopes!